Thich Nhat Hanh



Average: 4 (52 votes)
Fast Facts
Thich Nhat Hanh (Thay).jpg
Other Names and Nicknames: 
Thầy
Function: 
Monk
Traditions: 
Buddhism, Zen
Main Countries of Activity: 
Vietnam, USA, Europe
Date of Birth: 
October 11, 1926
Place of Birth: 
Quảng Ngãi, Vietnam
In His/Her Body ("alive"): 
Yes
Ancestor Gurus: 

Biography

Thich Nhat Hanh (called Thây by his students) is one of the well known and most respected Zen masters in the world today. He is also a poet, and peace and human rights activist.

He was born in central Vietnam in 1926 and joined the monkshood at the age of sixteen.

The Vietnam War confronted the monasteries with the question of whether to adhere to the contemplative life and remain meditating in the monasteries, or to help the villagers suffering under bombings and other devastation of the war. Nhat Hanh was one of those who chose to do both, helping to found the "engaged Buddhism" movement. His life has since been dedicated to the work of inner transformation for the benefit of individuals and society.

In Saigon in the early 60s, Thich Nhat Hanh founded the School of Youth Social Service, a grass-roots relief organization that rebuilt bombed villages, set up schools and medical centers, resettled homeless families, and organized agricultural cooperatives.

Despite government denunciation of his activity, Nhat Hanh also founded a Buddhist University, a publishing house, and an influential peace activist magazine in Vietnam.

He lives in the Plum Village Monastery in the Dordogne region in the South of France, travelling internationally to give retreats and talks. A long-term exile, he was given permission to make his first return trip to Vietnam in 2005.

He has published more than 100 books, including more than 40 in English. Nhat Hanh is active in the peace movement, promoting non-violent solutions to conflict.

Teachings

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Books & Media

Recommended Books: 
Cover image

Peace Is Every Step: The Path of Mindfulness in Everyday Life

by Thich Nhat Hanh

(Paperback)

Peace Is Every Step: The Path of Mindfulness in Everyday Life

Cover image

The Heart of the Buddha's Teaching: Transforming Suffering into Peace, Joy, and Liberation

by Thich Nhat Hanh

(Paperback)

In The Heart of the Buddha\'s Teaching, Thich Nhat Hanh introduces us to the core teachings of Buddhism and shows us that the Buddha\'s teachings are accessible and applicable to our daily lives. With poetry and clarity, Nhat Hanh imparts comforting wisdom about the nature of suffering and its role in creating compassion, love, and joy--all qualities of enlightenment. Covering such significant teachings as the Four Noble Truths, the Noble Eightfold Path, the Three Doors of Liberation, the Three Dharma Seals, and the Seven Factors of Awakening, The Heart of the Buddha\'s Teaching is a radiant beacon on Buddhist thought for the initiated and uninitiated alike.

Cover image

True Love: A Practice for Awakening the Heart

by Thich Nhat Hanh

(Paperback)

Love might not be what we think it is. We all seek the happiness that comes from loving and being loved, yet we often find ourselves dissatisfied in our relationships and unable to grasp the cause. Thich Nhat Hanh here shows the way to overcome our recurrent obstacles to love—by learning to be mindful, open, and present with ourselves and others. As he explains, “training is needed in order to love properly; and to be able to give happiness and joy, you must practice deep looking directed toward the person you love. Because if you do not understand this person, you cannot love properly. Understanding is the essence of love.”

This quintessential guide to loving also introduces the four key aspects of love described in the Buddhist tradition—loving-kindness, compassion, joy, and freedom—and describes many simple and direct ways in which we can practice authentic love in our everyday lives.