Swamini Mangalananda Giri



Average: 3.6 (27 votes)
Fast Facts
Swami Mangalananda Giri.jpg
Other Names and Nicknames: 
Swamini
Function: 
Spiritual Teacher
Traditions: 
Kriya Yoga, Vedanta, Yoga
Main Countries of Activity: 
Austria, Germany
Date of Birth: 
1972
Place of Birth: 
Germany
In His/Her Body ("alive"): 
Yes
Descendant Gurus: 
Other Related Gurus: 
Paramahamsa Hariharananda - her master

Biography

Born in Germany, Swami Mangalananda grew up near Stuttgart. In 1992, she received Kriya initiation from Rajarshi Peterananda, and then met her master Paramahamsa Hariharananda in 1994. From this time onward, she stayed with Paramahamsa Hariharananda in various ashrams, and also traveled with him throughout Europe.

After studying philosophy for some years Swamiji began studying medicine in Germany at Tubingen University. However, she chose to continue her medical degree at the University of Vienna, enabling her to complete her studies while simultaneously serving and living with her master. She received her MD in July, 2000.

Shortly after the completion of her studies, in September, 2000, she was ordained as a monk in the Giri monastic order and given the name Swami Mangalananda, which means bliss of auspiciousness. Swami Mangalananda is the first female monk in the lineage of Paramahamsa Hariharananda. She conducts Kriya Yoga programs in the Tattendorf ashram in Austria and throughout Europe.

Teachings

Kriya Yoga

A sincere spiritual seeker who follows the path of Kriya Yoga with love and devotion and a desire for spiritual growth can attain Self-realization — even within one lifetime. This powerful yoga is a manifestation of the many yogas described in the Bhagavad Gita, but primarily it derives from:

Karma Yoga — detachment from the fruits of actions in the world, and more importantly, from the inner activity of the mind.

Jnana Yoga — a disciplined intellect acquires spiritual knowledge, and this wisdom creates freedom through detachment from the fruits of actions.

Bhakti Yoga — unconditional love is awakened by gratitude and by the joy arising from the oneness with all creation, which is cosmic consciousness.

Kriya Yoga is non-sectarian. Its simple technique causes no hardship, requires no austerities, and suits aspiring householders as well as monks. From the principles of Karma Yoga, Kriya Yoga teaches that all action, kri, is done by the indwelling soul, ya. Continuous awareness of the power of the indwelling soul can transform all activity into worship. Awareness that the soul must inhale every breath leads to mind control and liberation.

The Kriya technique emphasizes the relationship between breath and mind. The breath influences the mind and vice-versa. This reciprocal relationship reveals the secret of controlling the mind: "Breath control is self-control. Breath mastery is self-mastery. Breathlessness is deathlessness." The breathless state of samadhi is the realization of the Absolute.

Direct Transmission From Teacher to Student

Kriya Yoga is a golden opportunity to reach higher states of consciousness and change your life, by developing the body, mind, intellect, and awareness of the soul. It is a quick and easy path. Kriya Yoga techniques are passed down from master to disciple, master to aspirant, teacher to student.

No written document records when the ancient tradition of Kriya Yoga began. This spiritual technique has been practiced by saints, seers, and sages from time immemorial. The rishis (seers) of the Upanishads, Shri Krishna in the Bhagavad Gita, Maharshi Patanjali in his Yoga Sutra, and many other masters of yoga practiced and taught this scientific method through the ages. Kriya Yoga is a powerful tool to be used by seekers of all religions in order to hasten spiritual development. Adi Shankara in the Viveka Chudamani described three things that are very rare in this world: to have a human birth, to have desire for liberation, and to have the company of a great soul and realized master.

Technique Origins

In modern times, in 1861, an elusive and mysterious master, Mahavatar Babaji, re-introduced the ancient Kriya technique to the general public through his able disciple, Shri Shyamacharan Lahiri, a pious householder. Lahiri Mahasaya, as he was popularly known, had many realized disciples. Foremost among them were Swami Shriyukteshwar Giri, who was well versed in the scriptures of both the East and West, and who attained the highest state of realization, and Shrimat Bhupendranath Sanyal Mahasaya, a householder yogi most noted for his metaphorical interpretation of the Bhagavad Gita in the light of Kriya Yoga. Among the many disciples of Swami Shriyukteshwar were Paramahamsa Yogananda, author of Autobiography of a Yogi, and Swami Satyananda Giri, who was the president of Karar Ashram until 1971, which had been founded by Swami Shriyukteshwar in 1903. Paramahamsa Hariharananda, who was president of Karar Ashram from 1971 as well as the president of the Kriya Yoga international organizations he founded, was also a direct disciple of Swami Shriyukteshwar. Both Paramahamsa Yogananda and Paramahamsa Hariharananda were Self-realized and instrumental in spreading the teachings of Kriya Yoga around the world.

Until the time of his mortal transition into spirit, December 3, 2002, at the age of 95 (1907-2002), Paramahamsa Hariharananda oversaw each student’s spiritual development. Lovingly called “Baba” by thousands of disciples and students around the world, his divine love and compassion remain unparalleled.