Maurice Frydman



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Fast Facts
maurice_frydman.jpg
Other Names and Nicknames: 
Swami Bharatananda, Maurycy Frydman, Maurycy Frydman-Mor, Maurice Fridman
Function: 
Writer
Traditions: 
Advaita
Main Countries of Activity: 
India
Date of Birth: 
1900
Place of Birth: 
Warsaw, Poland
In His/Her Body ("alive"): 
No
Date Left His/Her Body: 
9 March 1976

Biography

Maurice Frydman was an engineer, humanitarian and a close associate to notable spiritual teachers when he spent the later part of his life in India.

He was a Polish Jew who subsequently converted to Hinduism.

He became a disciple of Mahatma Gandhi, lived in his ashram, and took an active part in India's fight for independence. He was also very close to Nehru.

He was associated with the great spiritual teachers Sri Ramana Maharshi and J. Krishnamurti and a longtime friend to the famous Advaita guru, Nisargadatta Maharaj, who considered him a Jnani. He edited and translated Nisargadatta Maharaj's tape-recorded conversations into the English-language book "I Am That", published in 1973. Nisargadatta Maharaj was by his bedside when he died in 1976 in India.

According to David Godman, Nisargadatta Maharaj, in response to the question "'In all the years that you have been teaching how many people have truly understood and experienced your teachings?" replied: "One. Maurice Frydman".

Using his engineering skills, he made the spinning wheel that Gandhi himself used. Frydman created several new types of spinning wheels for Gandhi, which piqued his interest in finding the most efficient and economical spinning wheel for India.

He took an active part in India's fight for independence —notably in helping to draft a new constitution for the State of Aundh that became the Aundh Experiment.

Frydman came to India in the late 1930s as a Jewish refugee from Warsaw. A successful capitalist, he was managing director of the Mysore State Government Electrical Factory in Bangalore. Eventually he was won over by Hindu philosophy and became a sannyasi. Frydman was instrumental, along with Gandhi and the Raja of Aundh, in helping to draft the November Declaration, which handed over rule of the state of Aundh from the Raja to the residents in 1938-9.

He visited Swami Ramdas in the 1930s and Ramdas apparently told him that this would be his final birth. That comment was recorded in Talks with Sri Ramana Maharshi in the late 1930s, decades before he had his meetings with Nisargadatta Maharaj. He was at various stages of his life a follower of Ramana Maharshi, Gandhi, and J. Krishnamurti.

A senior Indian government official told David Godman in the 1960s that it was Frydman who persuaded the then India Prime Minister Nehru to allow the Dalai Lama and the other exiled Tibetans to stay in India. Frydman apparently pestered him continuously for months until he finally gave his consent. None of these activities were ever publicly acknowledged because Frydman disliked publicity of any kind and always tried to do his work anonymously.

Teachings

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Books & Media

Recommended Books: 
Cover image

I Am That: Talks with Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj

by Nisargadatta Maharaj

(Paperback)

This collection of the timeless teachings of one of the greatest sages of India, Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, regarded by many as a \"modern spiritual classic\" is a testament to the uniqueness of the seer\'s life and work

\"I Am That\" preserves Maharaj\'s dialogues with the followers who came from around the world seeking his guidance in destroying false identities. The sage\'s sole concern was with human suffering and the ending of suffering. It was his mission to guide the individual to an understanding of his true nature and the timelessness of being. He taught that mind must recognize and penetrate its own state of being, \"being this or that, here or that, then or now,\" but just timeless being.

Pro Opinions

Equal to Nisargadatta Maharaj in his contribution to I Am That

banana's picture

Many are not aware of Maurice Frydman's enormous but silent contribution to Advaitan seekers worldwide.