Varaha Upanishad---5

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16. I am not with those differences that are (observable)

in the body of low caste men, the body of cow, etc., the

fixed one’s, the bodies of Brahmanas and others.

17. As to a person, even after being relieved from the

misconception of the directions, the (same misconception

of) direction continues (as before), just so is to me the

universe though destroyed by Vijnana. Therefore the

universe is not.

18. I am neither the body nor the organs of sense and

action, nor Pranas, Nor Manas, nor Buddhi, nor Ahankara,

nor Chitta, nor Maya, nor the universe including Akasa and

others.

19. Neither am I the actor, the enjoyer, nor he who causes

the enjoyment. I am Brahman that is Chit, Sat and Ananda

alone and that is Janardana (Vishnu).

20. As, through the fluctuation of water, the sun

(reflected therein) is moved, so Atman arises in this

mundane existence through its mere connection with Ahankara
.
21. This mundane existence has Chitta as its root. This

(Chitta) should be cleansed by repeated effort. How is it

you have your confidence in the greatness of Chitta ?

22. Alas, where is all the wealth of the kings ! Where are

the Brahmanas ? Where are all the worlds ? All old ones are

gone. Many fresh evolutions have occurred.

23. Many Crores of Brahmas have passed away. Many kings

have flitted away like particles of dust. Even to a Jnani,

the love of the body may arise through the Asura

(demoniacal) nature. If the Asura nature should arise in a

wise man, his knowledge of truth becomes fruitless.

24. Should Rajas and others generated in us be burnt by the

fire of discriminative (divine) wisdom, how can they

germinate again ?

25. Just as a very intelligent person delights in the

shortcomings of another, so if one finds out his own faults

(and corrects them) who will not be relieved from bondage ?

26. O Lord of Munis, only he who has not Atma-Jnana and who

is not an emancipated person, longs after Siddhis. He

attains such Siddhis through medicine, (or wealth),

Mantras, religious works, time and skill.

27. In the eyes of an Atma-Jnani, these Siddhis are of no

importance. One who has become an Atma-Jnani, one who has

his sight solely on Atman, and one who is content with

Atman (the higher Self) through (his) Atman (or the lower

self), never follows (the dictates of) Avidya.

28. Whatever exists in this world, he knows to be of the

nature of Avidya. How then will an Atma-Jnani who has

relinquished Avidya be immersed in (or affected by) it.

29. Though medicine, Mantras, religious work, time and

skill (or mystical expressions) lead to the development of

Siddhis, yet they cannot in any way help one to attain the

seat of Paramatman.

30. How then can one who is an Atma-Jnani and who is

without his mind be said to long after Siddhis, while all

the actions of his desires are controlled ?”

Thus ends the third Chapter of Varaha Upanishad.

CHAPTER - IV

On another occasion Nidagha asked Lord Ribhu to enlighten

him as to the characteristics of Jivanmukti. To which Ribhu

replied in the affirmative and said the following: “In the

seven Bhumikas (or stages of development of wisdom) there

are four kinds of Jivanmuktas. Of these the first stage is

Subhechcha (good desire); the second is Vicharana

(inquiry); the third is Tanumanasi (or pertaining to the

thinned mind); the fourth is Sattvapatti (the attainment

of Sattva); the fifth is Asamsakti (non-attachment); the

sixth is the Padartha-Bhavana (analysis of objects) and the

seventh is the Turya (fourth or final stage). The Bhumika

which is of the form of Pranava (Om) is formed of (or is

divided into) Akara – ‘A’, Ukara – ‘U’, Makara - ‘M’ and

Ardha-Matra. Akara and others are of four kinds on account

of the difference of Sthula (gross) Sukshma (subtle), Bija

(seed or causal) and Sakshi (witness). Their Avasthas are

four: waking, dreaming, dreamless sleeping and Turya

(fourth). He who is in (or the entity that identifies

itself with) the waking state in the gross Amsa (essence or

part) of Akara is named Vishva; in the subtle essence, he

is termed Taijasa; in the Bija essence, he is termed

Prajna; and in the Sakshi essence, he is termed Turya.

He who is in the dreaming state (or the entity which

identifies itself with the dreaming state) in the gross

essence of Ukara is Vishva; in the subtle essence, he is

termed Taijasa; in the Bija essence, is termed Prajna; and

in the Sakshi essence, he is termed Turya.

He who is in the Sushupti state in the gross essence of

Makara is termed Vishva; in the subtle essence, Taijasa; in

the Bija essence, he is termed Prajna; and in the Sakshi

essence, he is termed Turya.

He who is in Turya State in the gross essence of

Ardha-Matra is termed Turya-Vishva. In the subtle, he is

termed Taijasa; in the Bija essence, he is termed Prajna;

and in the Sakshi essence, he is termed Turya-Turya.

The Turya essence of Akara is (or embraces) the first,

second and third (Bhumikas or stages of the seven). The

Turya essence of Ukara embraces the fourth Bhumika. The

Turya essence of Makara embraces the fifth Bhumika. The

Turya essence of Ardha-Matra is the sixth stage. Beyond

this, is the seventh stage.

One who functions in the (first) three Bhumikas is called

Mumukshu; one who functions in the fourth Bhumika is called

a Brahmavit; one who functions in the fifth Bhumika is

called a Brahmavidvara; one who functions in the sixth

Bhumika is called a Brahmavidvariya; and one in the seventh