PANCHADASI--- part 67

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E text source- www.celextel.org 87.It may be said that though in the world of relative experience both accept the conception of duality, the Yogi has the advantage that there is no duality for him while in the state of Samadhi. Our reply is that he who practises discrimination about the non-duality does not experience duality at that time.
88. In the next chapter, called the ‘Bliss of Non-duality’ we will enlarge on the theme of the absence of duality. Therefore things told till now are free from defects.
89. (Doubt): He is a true Yogi who in his contemplation is ever-conscious of the bliss of the Self and is unconscious of the external world. (Reply): May the blessings of contentment ever abide with you. (For the point is gained, this is the position of the Vivekin also).
90. In this second chapter of the section in which the bliss of Brahman is discussed we have dealt with the bliss of the Self (Atmananda) for the good of persons of spiritually dull intellect.
XIII. THE BLISS OF NON-DUALITY
1. The bliss of Yoga which was described earlier may be said to be the bliss of the Self. (Doubt): How can the bliss of the embodied Self which is in duality be identical with the bliss of Brahman (who is non-dual) ? (Reply): Please listen.
2. As described in the Taittiriya Upanishad, the whole world, from Akasa to the physical body, is not different from bliss. Therefore the bliss of the Self is of the nature of the non-dual Brahman.
3. The world is born of bliss, it abides in bliss and is merged in bliss. How then can it be anything other than this bliss ?
4. The pot made by a potter is different from him, but let this not create any doubt, for like the clay, bliss is the material cause of the universe, not like the potter the efficient cause.
5. The existence and destruction of the pot are never seen to rest in the potter, but its material cause, the clay. Similarly, according to the Shruti passages their (the existence and destruction of the universe) material cause is bliss.
6. The material cause is of three kinds: (1) the Vivarta, which gives rise to a phenomenal appearance, not materially related to the cause; (2) the Parinama which gives rise to an effect which is a modification or change of state of the cause; and (3) the Arambha which consists of effect being different from the causes. The last two (which presuppose parts) have no scope with reference to partless Brahman.
7. The Arambhavadins accept the production of one kind of material from another, as cloth from threads and they consider threads and cloth to be quite different.
8. Parinama is the change of one state of the same substance into another, as milk into curd, clay into a pot and gold into an ear-ring.
9. But Vivarta is mere appearance of change of a thing or its state, not a real change: like a rope appearing as a snake. It is seen even in a partless substance, e.g., the Akasa (which has no shape or colour) appearing as the blue dome.
10. So the illusive appearance of the world in the partless bliss can be explained. Like the power of a magician, the power of Maya may be said to bring the objective world into being.
11. Power does not exist apart from the possessor of power, for it is always seen as inseparable from him. Nor can it be said to be identical with him, for its obstruction is met with. If identical, in the absence of power, of what is the obstruction ?
12. Power is inferred from its effect. When its effects are not seen we conclude that there is some obstruction to it. For instance, if the flames of a fire do not burn, we infer the presence of some obstruction, such as incantation etc.
13. The sages perceived that the power of Brahman called Maya is concealed by its own qualities. Many are the aspects of this divine power, which is manifest as action, knowledge and will.
14. “The supreme Brahman is eternal, perfect, non-dual and omnipotent”, so says the Veda and Vasistha supports this.
15. ‘With whatever power He means to sport, that power becomes manifest. O Rama, the power of Brahman which manifests itself as consciousness is felt in the bodies of all beings’.
16. ‘This power abides as movement in the air, as hardness in stone, as liquidity in water, as the power to burn in fire’.
17. ‘Similarly it abides as emptiness in Akasa and as perishability in the objects which are subject to destruction. As a huge serpent is latent in the egg, so the world is latent in the Self’.
18. ‘Just as a tree with its fruits, leaves, tendrils, flowers, branches, twigs and roots is latent in the seed, so does this world abide in Brahman’.
19. ‘Due to variations in space and time, somewhere, some times, some powers emanate from Brahman, just as varieties of paddy from the earth.’
20. ‘O Rama, when the all-pervasive, eternal and infinite Self assumes the power of cognition, we call it the mind’
21. ‘O Prince, first arises the mind, then the notion of bondage and release and then the universe consisting of many worlds. Thus all this manifestation has been fixed or settled (in human minds), like the tales told to amuse children’.
22. ‘To amuse a child, O mighty one, the nurse relates some beautiful story: Once upon a time there were three handsome princes’.
23. ‘Two of them were never born and the third was never even conceived in his mother’s womb. They lived righteously in a city which never existed.’
24. ‘These holy princes came out of their city of non-existence and while roaming saw trees, laden with fruits, growing in the sky’.
25. ‘Then the three princes, my child, went to a city which was yet to be built and lived there happily, passing their time in games and hunting’.
26. ‘O Rama, the nurse thus narrated the beautiful children’s tale. The child too through want of discrimination believed it to be true.
27. ‘Thus to those who have no discrimination the world appears to be real like the tale repeated to the child’.