NITYAS OR RAYS OF LALITA DEVI.

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am1According to the Tantraraja, the 15 Nityas are limbs or rays of Lalita, who is herself pure consciousness without additions.

Varahi and Kurukulla bear the relationship of father and mother respectively. The Nityas themselves can be meditated upon and worshipped in different forms and colours for the attainment of different ends. In daily worship (puja) of the Nityas, each has her own nyasa and ritual sequence and they are to receive puja on the lunar days associated with them. The vidya mantras of the different Nityas below are prefaced by Aim Hrim Shrim bija mantras and suffixed with Shri Padukam Pujayami Tarpayami Namah, that is Hail. I worship and libate the auspicious lotus feet [of the appropriate Nitya]. The yantras used below are those from the Tantraraja while the Sanskrit syllables are the vowel letters associated with each Nitya and day of the Moon.

Kameshvari Nitya

The first Nitya in the cycle is Kameshvari, a name which means Lady of Desire. Her vidya (mantra) according to the Tantrarajatantra, is Aim Hrim Shrim Am Aim Sa Ka La Hrim Nityaklinne Madadrave Sauh Am Kameshvari Nitya Shri Padukam Pujayami Tarpayami Namah.

The same tantra gives her dhyana or meditation image as red like 10 million dawn suns, having a diadem of rubies, wearing throat ornaments, necklaces, waistchains and rings. She is red, has six arms and three eyes, and bears a crescent Moon, smiling softly. She holds a bow of sugar cane, flowering arrows, noose, goad, and a nectar-filled begemmed cup, showing the mudra of bestowing boons. The five arrows of desire (Kama) in the five petals are Longing, Maddening, Kindling, Enchanting and Wasting. These five Kamas are five forms of Kamadeva, Lalita as

Krishna, who are Kamaraja (Hrim), Manmatha (Klim), Kandarpa (Aim), Makara (Blum) and Manobhava (Strim) with the colours yellow, white, red, purple and blue. Each of the Kamadevas has two eyes and two arms, the hands holding sugar cane bow and flowering arrows, the very form of the five elements
amBhagamalini Nitya

Nitya Bhagamalini, whose name refers to the flowering yoni, is

second of the cycle of the waxing Moon and has a remarkable and very long vidya (mantra) which runs: Aim Hrim Shrim Am Aim Bhagabuge Bhagini Bhagodari Bhagamale Bhagavahe Bhagaguhye Bhagayoni Bhaganipatini Sarvabhagavashankari Bhagarupe Nityaklinne Bhagasvarupe Sarvani Bhagani Me Hyanaya Varade Rete Surete Bhagaklinne Klinnadrave Kledaya Dravaya Amoghe Bhagavicce Kshubha Kshobhaya Sarvasatvan Bhagodari Aim Blum Jem Blum Bhem Blum Mom Blum Hem Blum Hem Klinne Sarvani Bhagani Me Vashamanaya Strim Hara Blem Hrim Am Bhagamalini Nitya Shri Padukam Pujayami Tarpayami Namah.

She has six arms, three eyes, sits on a lotus and holds in her left hands a night water lily, a noose and a sugar cane bow and in her right a lotus, a goad and flowering arrows. Around her is a host of Shaktis all of whom look like her, according to the Tantrarajatantra.

The

Dakshinamurti Samhita has a different image (dhyana). Here (chapter 41), she is described as dwelling in the middle of a flowery forest, adorned with various gems, holding noose, goad, book, scales, nail (?) and writing implement, showing the mudras or hand gestures of allaying fears and bestowing boons. Her yantra is described differently, too, as triangle, hexagon, 16 petals, eight petals, then the bhupura or fence.